Space: Implications for National Security

National Security College | Professional course
Space

Summary

Space has serious implications for national security, given our global dependence on over 1,900 satellites (and other space systems) to inform Defence and intelligence. Space systems are dependent on cyber and therefore vulnerable to a wide array of threats such as attacks and jamming. There are also significant multi-disciplinary challenges such as the increasing adverse impact of space debris on capability; the pressing need for international regulatory frameworks; and the emerging impact of commercial activities such as mining. Improve your space situation awareness and the issues, risks and challenges for the national security community.

Venue: 
#132 Crawford Building, #132 Crawford Building, 1 Lennox Crossing, ANU
Cost: 

A fee of $2,250 (GST ex) applies to this course for Commonwealth participating agencies and NSC Partners. The open rate is $2,700 (GST ex).

Course overview

In October 2018, the ANU launched its new innovation institute, InSpace, which fuses technology, science and law research to advance Australia’s space industry. Space has serious implications for national security, given our global dependence on over 1,900 satellites (and other space systems) to inform our Defence and intelligence capabilities. Space-related systems are critical to our climate observation, economic and transport systems. Space systems are dependent on cyber and therefore vulnerable to a wide array of threats such as attacks and jamming. There are also significant multi-disciplinary challenges such as the increasing adverse impact of space debris on capability; the pressing need for international regulatory frameworks; and the emerging impact of commercial activities including mining. Improve your space situation awareness and the issues, risks and challenges for the national security community.

This two-day course enables you to learn from, and engage with, Academics and sector leaders from astrophysics, space law, critical infrastructure, defence and intelligence. The program is designed for officers from all departments and agencies, as well as professionals, analysts, leaders from other organisations, who would benefit from a deeper understanding of the current state of space and the implications for national security decision and policy making.

Course details

Two-day non-residential, fully-catered course.
An ANU parking permit will be supplied.
Course time: 8-30am - 5-00pm.
2019 dates TBC.
Places on this course are limited. To secure your place, or to obtain further
information, please contact us at nsc.epdnominations@anu.edu.au or download our nomination form.

Course convenor

Sandra Bourke

Sandra Bourke joined the National Security College in February 2018, on secondment from the Home Affairs portfolio, as a Manager in the Executive and Professional Development team. Her career focus has been on intelligence, criminology and defence, in particular delivering and managing technology as an enabling capability for national security. Sandra’s career commenced in 1990 as a serving AFP Detective before moving into intelligence management positions at the former National Crime Authority and at the NSW Police. Between 1996 and 1998, Sandra also taught criminology at the University of Western Sydney (undergrad). In 2004, Sandra established the first NSW Police Project Management Office. A highlight project was the establishment of the State Crime Command. This role led to broader PM experience in the private sector with a focus on technology. This included operational management at the Centre for Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism at Macquarie University. In 2011, Sandra took up the position of Director, Air Force Improvement at Headquarters Air Command. In 2015, Sandra was transferred to Canberra under the Defence Executive Development program. She recently returned to the criminal justice sector, focusing on ICT capabilities for national security. Sandra’s academic qualifications include a Bachelor of Arts (Education and Government) from the University of Sydney and a Master of Social Science (Criminology) from Charles Sturt University. Sandra is currently enrolled in a Master of National Security Policy (Advanced) at the ANU NSC.

Course presenter(s)

Dr Bradley Tucker

Dr Bradley Tucker, B.Sc. Physics, B.A. Philosophy, Theology, Ph.D. Astronomer, Cosmology, Dark Energy, Supernovae, GRBs, Transient Host Galaxies, Galactic Evolution The Kepler Extra-Galactic Survey - GLUV - The Skymapper Supernova Survey - OzDES = The Australian Dark Energy Survey

Projects Supervisor, A high-altitude survey for nearby supernova Supervisor, Analysis of 5-year sample DES sample of Type Ia supernovae: developing the next generation cosmology fitter Supervisor, Characterising biases in the Pantheon sample of Type Ia supernovae Supervisor, Characterising the relationship between supernovae and its host through spectra Supervisor, Dark Matter, Positrons, and the Galactic Bulge Binary Population Supervisor, Extending the OzDES AGN Reverberation Mapping Program to year 7 and beyond Supervisor, Performance of the SkyMapper Supernovae Search Supervisor, SkyMapper Transient Survey Supervisor, The impact of systematic redshift errors on dark energy constraints Supervisor, The Kepler Extra-Galactic Survey - Supernovae, Black Holes, and Cosmology Supervisor, Using SN free host spectra to improve spectral classification

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Updated:  21 June 2017/Responsible Officer:  Head of College, National Security College/Page Contact:  Web administrator