Space: Implications for National Security

National Security College | Professional course
Space

Summary

Space has serious implications for national security, given our global dependence on over 1,900 satellites (and other space systems) to inform Defence and intelligence. Space systems are dependent on cyber and therefore vulnerable to a wide array of threats such as attacks and jamming. There are also significant multi-disciplinary challenges such as the increasing adverse impact of space debris on capability; the pressing need for international regulatory frameworks; and the emerging impact of commercial activities such as mining. Improve your space situation awareness and the issues, risks and challenges for the national security community.

Course date: 
9am–5pm 29 August 2019
Venue: 
#132 Crawford Building, #132 Crawford Building, 1 Lennox Crossing, ANU
Cost: 

A fee of $1,300 (GST ex) applies to this course for Commonwealth participating agencies and NSC Partners. The open rate is $1,600 (GST ex).

Course overview

In October 2018, the ANU launched its new innovation institute, InSpace, which fuses technology, science and law research to advance Australia’s space industry. Space has serious implications for national security, given our global dependence on over 1,900 satellites (and other space systems) to inform our Defence and intelligence capabilities. Space-related systems are critical to our climate observation, economic and transport systems. Space systems are dependent on cyber and therefore vulnerable to a wide array of threats such as attacks and jamming. There are also significant multi-disciplinary challenges such as the increasing adverse impact of space debris on capability; the pressing need for international regulatory frameworks; and the emerging impact of commercial activities including mining. Improve your space situation awareness and the issues, risks and challenges for the national security community.

This one-day course enables you to learn from, and engage with, academics, private and public sector leaders. The program is designed for officers from all departments and agencies, as well as professionals, analysts, leaders from other organisations, who would benefit from a deeper understanding of the current state of space and the implications for national security decision and policy making.

Course details

One-day non-residential, fully-catered course.
An ANU parking permit will be supplied.
Course time: 9-00am - 5-00pm.

Places on this course are limited. To secure your place, or to obtain further
information, please contact us at epd.nsc@anu.edu.au or download our nomination form.

Course convenor

Dr Kathleen Gleeson

Dr Kathleen Gleeson commenced with the NSC in July 2019 on secondment from the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) where she was in charge of training and education for the agency.

Areas of focus during her career include the design, development and delivery of training and learning focussed on capability building within the AEC but also internationally through the ‘Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections’ (BRIDGE) Program.

She also performed roles focussed on electoral management, reform and operational delivery both in Australia and overseas, and spent time in the not-for-profit sector and in academia.

Kathleen holds a PhD in Politics and International Relations from the University of New South Wales and a Bachelor and Arts (Honours) from the University of Newcastle.

Course presenter(s)

Professor Brian P. Schmidt AC FAA FRS

The Vice-Chancellor is the President and Chief Executive Officer of ANU.

The Vice-Chancellor guides strategy and day-to-day leadership for the University and is also a member of the Council.

Professor Brian P. Schmidt was appointed Vice-Chancellor of ANU in January 2016.

Professor Schmidt is the 12th Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University (ANU). Winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Professor Schmidt was an astrophysicist at the ANU Mount Stromlo Observatory and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics before becoming Vice-Chancellor.

Professor Schmidt received undergraduate degrees in Astronomy and Physics from the University of Arizona in 1989, and completed his Astronomy Master’s degree (1992) and PhD (1993) from Harvard University. Under his leadership, in 1998, the High-Z Supernova Search team made the startling discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating. Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, The United States Academy of Science, and the Royal Society, he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia in 2013.

Dr Bradley Tucker

Brad is an Astrophysicist/Cosmologist, and currently a Research Fellow at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt. Stromlo Observatory at the Australian National University.

Brad has a hand in a variety of things, but the majority of his work involves Exploding stars called Supernova and Cosmology, the study of the Universe. For this work, he is involved with a number of supernova surveys. He has been working on the ESSENCE Project, The CfA Supernova Search, The Carnegie Supernova Project and also using Mt. Stromlo’s new SkyMapper telescope. He is one of the leads of the Kepler Extra-Galactic Survey, KEGS, a Kepler Space Telescope Key Program, to understand why and how stars blow. He is leading a project to build a network of ultraviolet telescopes in the upper atmosphere which are being built at Mt. Stromlo.

Dr Malcolm Davis

Dr Malcolm Davis joined ASPI as a Senior Analyst in Defence Strategy and Capability in January 2016.

Prior to this he was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in China-Western Relations with the Faculty of Society and Design at Bond University from March 2012 to January 2016, and he currently retains an Honorary Assistant Professor position in the Faculty. He has worked with the Department of Defence, both in Navy Headquarters in the Strategy and Force Structure area, and with Strategic Policy Division in the Strategic Policy Guidance and Strategic External Relations and Education sections from November 2007 to March 2012. Prior to this appointment he was a Lecturer in Defence Studies with Kings College London at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, in Shrivenham, UK, from June 2000 to October 2007. He holds a PhD in Strategic Studies from the University of Hull as well as two Masters degrees in Strategic Studies, including from the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. His main research focus is on defence strategy and capability development, military technology, and the future of warfare.

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