The Indo-Pacific: Breakfast Series

National Security College | Professional course
The Indo-Pacific: Breakfast Series

Summary

Join us for our exciting new breakfast series on the Indo-Pacific. Running over five consecutive Fridays (8am-10am), take time to examine the Indo-Pacific as a strategic concept encompassing China, India, Japan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and other outward-looking trading states and strategic actors, including the USA. Consider the implications for Australia’s national security and interests, force posture, alliances and international relations. Deep dive into each of these regional actors to understand the geopolitical relationships, the economic and security connections, and developments on the horizon.

Course date: 
8–10am 24 May 2019
8–10am 31 May 2019
8–10am 7 June 2019
8–10am 14 June 2019
8–10am 21 June 2019
Venue: 
#132 Crawford Building, Lennox Crossing, ANU
Cost: 

A fee of $2,250 (GST ex) applies to this course for Commonwealth participating agencies and NSC Partners. The open rate is $2,700 (GST ex).

Course overview

Scope and content

Join us for our exciting new breakfast series on the Indo-Pacific. Running over five consecutive Fridays (8am-10am), take time to examine the Indo-Pacific as a strategic concept encompassing China, India, Japan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and other outward-looking trading states and strategic actors, including the USA. Consider the implications for Australia’s national security and interests, force posture, alliances and international relations. Deep dive into each of these regional actors to understand the geopolitical relationships, the economic and security connections, and developments on the horizon. Sessions include: - Indo-Pacific as a strategic concept
- Strategic Actors: China, USA, India, Japan, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, etc - Geo-economics & geo-politics
- Horizon developments & implications

Who should attend? This course is for all staff who will benefit from a deep understanding of the Indo-Pacific as a coherent strategic concept. It will inform policy development and international relations.

Course details

  • Five Fridays: 2 hours non-residential, fully-catered series (hot breakfast)
  • Course Dates: 5 Friday mornings: 24/05, 31/05, 07/06, 14/06. 21/06
  • Course Timings 0800am - 1000am
  • Certificate of Completion provided
  • Parking available on campus (self pay options)

Please click here to register or contact us at nsc.epdnominations@anu.edu.au for further information.

Course convenor

Mr Brad Fallen

Brad Fallen joined the National Security College as Manager, Executive and Professional Development in March 2018, on secondment from the Department of Home Affairs. Brad’s professional national security experience includes international relations, intelligence, Cabinet and ministerial decision-making, and policy development and delivery. As Senior Adviser International Cyber Policy in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) from 2014, Brad was part of the small team who delivered Australia’s 2016 Cyber Security Review and Strategy. He then implemented the Strategy for 18 months from the Office of the Cyber Security Special Adviser. Brad led PM&C’s National Security Committee Secretariat between 2011 and 2014, supporting Prime Ministers Gillard, Rudd and Abbott, and before this the Department of Defence’s Cabinet and Freedom of Information teams from 2008 to 11. He was Defence Adviser to the Minister Assisting the Minister for Defence, the Hon Bruce Scott MP, in 2000-01. Brad studied South Pacific history at the University of Queensland before joining the Department of Defence’s Graduate program in 1988. Brad’s career in Defence focused on Australia’s regional relationships, and included three years as First Secretary (Defence) at the Australian High Commission in Port Moresby, and two years seconded to the New Zealand Government in Wellington.

Course presenter(s)

Professor Rory Medcalf

Professor Rory Medcalf has been Head of the National Security College at the Australian National University since January 2015. He has led the expansion of the College into policy engagement as well as education, executive development and research. His professional background involves more than two decades of experience across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks and journalism, including a formative role as Director of the International Security Program at the Lowy Institute. In government, Professor Medcalf worked as a senior strategic analyst with the Office of National Assessments, Canberra’s peak intelligence analysis agency. He was also an Australian diplomat, with wide experience including a posting to New Delhi, a secondment to the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, truce monitoring after the civil conflict in Bougainville and policy development on Asian security institutions. He has contributed to three landmark reports on nuclear arms control: the 1996 Canberra Commission, 1999 Tokyo Forum and 2009 International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament. His earlier work in journalism was commended in Australia’s leading media awards, the Walkleys. Professor Medcalf has been prominent in developing Australia’s relations with India. He has been Associate Director of the Australia-India Institute and Senior Research Fellow in Indian Strategic Affairs at the University of New South Wales. He is the founding convener and co-chair of the Australia-India Policy Forum, an influential informal dialogue between the two countries. He has been recognised as a thought leader internationally for his work on the Indo-Pacific concept of the Asian maritime strategic environment. Professor Medcalf was a member of the expert panel providing independent advice on the Australian Government’s 2016 Defence White Paper. His research areas include Australia’s security challenges, the further development of an Indo-Pacific concept of the Asian strategic environment, China-India relations, and prospects for maritime and nuclear stability in Indo-Pacific Asia, on which he has led projects funded by the MacArthur Foundation. He is currently chief investigator in a major two-year research project funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, examining the risks to nuclear stability from new submarine-detection technologies. Professor Medcalf is a member of the editorial boards of Asia Policy and the Australian Journal of International Affairs. He is a Non-resident Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy with the Brookings Institution in Washington DC and retains affiliations as a Non-resident Fellow with the Lowy Institute for International Policy and the Seapower Centre of the Royal Australian Navy. Professor Medcalf also teaches the NSC’s National Security in the Indo-Pacific and National Security Policymaking courses. https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/medcalf-r Visit his researcher profile.

Associate Professor Michael Clarke

Dr Michael Clarke is an internationally recognised expert on the history and politics of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, People’s Republic of China (PRC), Chinese foreign policy in Central Asia, Central Asian geopolitics, and nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation. He has generated numerous academic publications across these fields of research including one sole authored book, one co-authored book, five edited books, thirty-four peer reviewed journal articles, and fourteen book chapters. He also regularly provides expert media commentary on Uyghur/Xinjiang and Chinese foreign policy-related issues to national and international media and has published commentary with Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, The National Interest, CNN, BBC News, South China Morning Post, and The Diplomat amongst others. He has also provided advice and testimony to the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission on Chinese policy in Xinjiang and China’s foreign policy in Central Asia and Afghanistan.

Dr Jen Hunt

Dr. Jennifer S. Hunt is a lecturer in the National Security College and a research associate at the US Studies Centre. Publishing on comparative national security policy in the US, Australia, and the Arab Gulf, her research portfolio examines the intersection between defense, energy, and economic security issues. Dr. Hunt holds a PhD and Master’s Degree in International Security from the University of Sydney. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (USA) where she was captain of the Women’s Sabre Fencing team. From 2011-2012, she was a visiting researcher at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. As part of her research and consulting practice, Dr. Hunt also attended the World Economic Forum in Abu Dhabi, and studied Arabic at the Qasid Institute in Jordan. Prior to joining the NSC, Dr. Hunt was based at the University of Sydney US Studies Centre, the Centre for International Security Studies, and Sydney Business School. She has been student-nominated for teaching awards across security studies, business and politics departments. Along with her academic areas of specialisation, Dr. Hunt also publishes on applied research methods. Together with Dr. Zina O’Leary, Workplace Research: Conducting small scale applied research, was published by Sage in 2016.

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